Acclimation to Ocean Acidification: Give It Some Time
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  Posted on: Thursday, March 29, 2012
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Acclimation to Ocean Acidification: Give It Some Time
Source: World Climate Report

Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels lead to an increasing amount of CO2 being dissolved in the oceans which drives down the oceans' pH level. This is often referred to as "ocean acidification" and included among the list of ills that energy production from fossil fuels imparts to the environment. Type "ocean acidification" into your Google search and you'll quickly be confronted with a litany of potential impacts-all bad. The Center for Biological Diversity refers to it as global warming's "evil twin."

"We mean it this time" our greener friends are saying about this current apocalypse. But is ocean acidification any different than the population bomb, global starvation, acid rain, ozone depletion, global cooling, and global warming-all forecast to cause the end of the world as we know it, and all falling a bit short?
It's beginning to look like the same old same old. In what will come as no surprise to World Climate Report regulars, alarmists are overdoing things just a little. Their biggest mistake comes in assuming that the oceans' denizens cannot deal either with the pace or the magnitude of the projected changes to the oceans' chemistry.

The more researchers look into this, the more they report findings to the contrary.

A large and continually updated annotated and summarized collection of findings which report acclimation and adaptation to "ocean acidification" is maintained at the Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change. Spend a little time there and you will come away with a completely different view of the subject than was returned to you in your Google search above. The Center also maintains a digital archive of citations to the relevant primary scientific literature, so you can see for yourself.

A new paper just published in the journal Global Change Biology titled "Acclimation to ocean acidification during long-term CO2 exposure in the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa " is surely soon to be an inductee in the Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change database.


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** For additional peer-reviewed scientific references and an in-depth discussion of the science supporting our position, please visit Climate Change Reconsidered: The Report of the Nongovernmental Planel on Climate Change (www.climatechangereconsidered.org), or CO2 Science (www.co2science.org).
 
 
 
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